2g & h: Collect & analyze student achievement data

“Technology coaches assist teachers in using technology effectively for assessing student learning, differentiating instruction and providing rigorous, relevant and engaging learning experiences for all students” (ISTE 2011).

g. Coach teachers in and model effective use of technology tools and resources to continuously assess student learning and technology literacy by applying a rich variety of formative and summative assessments aligned with content and student technology standards.

h. Coach teachers in and model effective use of technology tools and resources to systematically collect and analyze student achievement data, interpret results and communicate findings to improve instructional practice and maximize student learning.

A successful school technology program “systematically collect[s] and analyze[s] student achievement data, interpret results and communicate findings to improve instructional practice and maximize student learning” (ISTE 2011). Technology coaches can support this effort by designing learning experiences that include “a rich variety of formative and summative assessments aligned with content and student technology standards” (ISTE 2011).

During my daily life as a Language Arts & Social Studies teacher, many technology tools were useful in collecting data about student achievement. Socrative, Quizlet, and Google Forms allowed me to quickly administer a quiz and to be able to revisit the data. Polling tools (PollEverywhere) and shared workspace tools (Padlet) allowed me to gather information about student understanding at any moment and from every student.

For most of my classes, the “launchpad” for these tools was the class blog (Edublogs, Edublogs CampusPress) I curated with daily posts about each day’s lessons, including links to all of the tools and resources students would need to access. I also piloted Google Classroom, and made use of the built-in tools and G Suite for Education apps to collect student achievement data. I used Nearpod’s Common Sense Education Digital Citizenship Curriculum package to teach digital citizenship in grades 6-8, and made use of Nearpod’s built-in student assessment data collection features.

Students also used personal student blogs to curate a portfolio of their work for my classes, as well as other subject areas. Each blog represented a treasure trove of learning artifacts that could be accessed by all teachers at any time and combed for evidence of areas of strength and areas in need of improvement.

As my school’s Technology Integration Specialist, I led the effort to explore and implement best practices in technology-based assessment, and to identify, pilot and streamline use of technology-based assessment tools that would allow us to “systematically collect and analyze student achievement data, interpret results and communicate findings to improve instructional practice and maximize student learning” (ISTE 2011).


Works Cited

  1. International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE; 2011). Standards for Coaches. Retrieved from http://www.iste.org/standards/standards/standards-for-coaches

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